Climate change means more extreme weather events like mega droughts and floods. But even the poor farmer can be prepared for the impact of climate change. Droughts caused by climate change mean land degradation and livestock deaths. Floods aggravated by climate change mean soil erosion and water logged soils. The UN's Food and Agriculture Organization is testing simple measures in Ethiopia that will reduce the impact of climate change. See why COP 16 in Cancun is so important.

Agriculture / Food Security
disaster risk management disaster preparedness Ethiopia Africa drought flood UN development African agriculture climate change extreme weather events COP 16 Cancun
May 24, 2011

The MERET project, launched by WFP and the Ethiopian government in 2003, helps poor farmers manage land better, so that it becomes more productive and does not become desert. Hiwot Gebre-Tsadkan explains how it changed her life.

Agriculture / Food Security
Haiti Pakistan Chad WFP World Food Programme Adaptation Coping strategies
May 24, 2011

Global food security and climate change are among the most pressing issues the world will face in the 21st Century, according to the Rural Poverty Report 2011, prepared by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). The report shows that climate change will have its greatest economic impact on poor rural people, particularly as extreme weather events increasingly degrade the natural resources base for agriculture. In this video, herder Avid Enkhtaivar talks about the extreme weather events he's witnessed in Mongolia.

Other Organization:International Fund for Agricultural Development
Agriculture / Food Security
Mongolia Ifad International Fund for agricultural development climate change impact
May 24, 2011

The Pacific islands of Kiribati were among the last places to be colonized by humans. But now, because of rising sea levels, they may be among the first to be abandoned. Should Kiribati President Anote Tong surrender to climate change and evacuate? Can anything be done to help him buy more time?
Should Kiribati President Anote Tong surrender to climate change and evacuate? Can anything be done to help him buy more time?

Other Organization:International Fund for Agricultural Development
Agriculture / Food Security, Coastal Zone Management
Anote Tong, Climate Change, climate refugees, country disappearing, culture, Economic Growth, environment, exodus, fishing, migration, relocate, salt water, sea-level rising, sinking, Tarawa, United Nations
May 24, 2011

What happens when small holder farmers from different parts of the developing world share their knowledge and experience? In 2007, four farmer couples, (husbands and wives), from Oases in Morocco spent six months living with oasis farmers in Mauritania who were struggling to survive. This short video looks at what happened.

Other Organization:International Fund for Agricultural Development
Agriculture / Food Security
mauritania IFAD international fund for agricultural development climate change adaptation
May 24, 2011

Jordan is in the part of the world where farming began. Ninety percent of the country receives less than 25 centimetres of rain a year. Without the farmers it would revert to desert. Down the centuries they were ingenious at developing sophisticated methods to use water sparingly: now lapsed into disrepair, the water channels that fed Petra are evidence of this skill. But Jordan, with a burgeoning human population swelled by refugees from the Middle East conflicts, faces a crisis. Demand for water is so great that the Dead Sea itself is predicted to disappear.

Other Organization:International Fund for Agricultural Development
Agriculture / Food Security
climate change adaptation, IFAD, Jordan
May 24, 2011