Climate Change Adaptation in the Pangani River Basin

Author(s):
Brief published by the Pangani River Basin Management Project
Year:
2011
Pages:
2
Summary:

Read the briefing note for details on specific adaptation activities, climate change impacts, vulnerability assessment and community consultations.

Project: Mainstreaming Climate Change in Integrated Water Resources Management in Pangani River Basin

Funding Source:
GEF-SCCF

Building Community Resillience in the Water Sector (IWRM) through Capacity Building, Policy Research and Action, Awareness Creation and Education

Summary:

The project sought to coordinate efforts to conserve and store water, reducing the effects of flooding through flood water retention, strengthening existing adaptation strategies (e.g. dry season farming), and providing mechanisms for timely climate forecast and information for communities in times of expected floods and drought in over ten Districts. Water storage facilities of different types depending on uses such as flood storm reduction, livestock watering, dry season gardening, groundwater recharge and domestic uses, were provided in over twenty communities across the three northern regions. These were preceded by customised awareness creation and tailor made capacity building and training activities. Major parners were Alternative Initiative for Development (AID), Centre for Human and Environmental Security (CHES), and University for Development Studies.

Adaptation Experience:
Results and Learning:

The project activities have shown contributions to building and strengthening the resilience of socioeconomically weakened communities with benefits trickling down to households especially those that are poor, having very limited resources with less mobility. Decision making for project activities had no gender imbalances as both gender contributed equally to approaches, the selection and siting of facilities as well as the overall management of connected small projects including expected benefit sharing. Water harvesting facilities were expected to not only serve food crop production purposes and gardening but also for livestock watering, and building and construction of houses, as well as for flood control in some cases.

Sustainability:

The factors that underline the replicability of the activities are already practical recipes for sustaining the project. Local communities are determined in their own little ways to emulate what have been achieved in other communities. However, these efforts would require some high level adoption and intervention to avoid lags in adaptation and to also ensure quality, the order of the day. Most materials developed under the project are already being used nationally especially those on flooding which are providing necessary resources for the National Disaster Management Organisation (NADMO) hence some project activities are already enjoying an up-scaling and which must be sustained. Danida provided further support to the outcomes of this pilot so as to enhance sustainability. This takes the form of a practical climate change adaptation learning centre in Bolgatanga at the White Volta basin office to ensure sustained awareness, education and technical support through visitations made to the centre. However, this pilot phase should have been scaled up to real project status and then later years to programmes by the District Assemblies but just when the Assemblies started imbibing the concept of climate mainstreaming, the pilot phase was already concluding. A community investment support fund would in no doubt be an asset to continue with this project until such time that communities learn the appropriate way in harnessing water resources for their own water usage in the face of climate change and variability.

Replication:

The most achieved and conspicuous impact of the approaches for implementing the project was to ensure easy replicability and knowledge sharing. This includes technical and non-technical assistance from the WRC through interaction of various communities’ leadership and their offer to help neighbours. What this project has therefore nurtured as an innovation and thinking outside the box is to promote intercultural exchange of experiences with respect to the project activities involving the deliberate movement of people into new environments to assist in providing adaptation support. Awareness creation materials and information brochures are tangible resources that are being used by poor and vulnerable communities to tell their own stories and specifically what they are looking forward to doing. Such materials have enlightened several actors interested in adaptation. There were no big or small actors as equal playing field was maintained for all to do what was expected of them and in spite of being a pilot project with limited financial resources a lot more was achieved than commensurate with the level of funding. The potential to replicate therefore is very straightforward, readily available human capacity and requiring very little financial investment to undertake. For the good of sustainability most of the activities are now seen as cross-cultural in the context of adaptation to climate change rather than as livelihoods support only.

Funding Source:
Danish International Development Assistance (DANIDA)

PACC Solomon Islands: In-Country Consultation Report

Author(s):
PACC
Year:
June 2009
Pages:
37
Summary:

This report provides the outcomes of the Solomon Islands in-country consultations on PACC which was held in the Solomon Islands from July 24 to 28, 2006. The report is divided into five sections:

Funding Source:
GEF-SCCF

PACC Vanuatu: In-Country Consultation Report

Author(s):
SPREP
Year:
June 2009
Pages:
39
Summary:

This report provides the outcomes of the Vanuatu in-country consultations on PACC which were held from August 01 to 04 2006. The report is divided into five sections:

Funding Source:
GEF-LDCF

PACC Tuvalu: Report of In-Country Consultations

Author(s):
PACC
Year:
June 2009
Editor:
SPREP
Pages:
26
Summary:

This report provides the outcomes of Tuvalu in-country consultations on PACC which were held from October 09 to 12, 2006. The report is divided into five sections:

Funding Source:
GEF-SCCF

Tuvalu Pacific Adaptation to Climate Change PACC Project

Author(s):
NA
Year:
June 2011
Volume:
Volume 1 Issue 2
Pages:
4
Summary:

Climate Change Policy Development Consultation

Funding Source:
GEF-SCCF

1st Quarter 2010 PACC Newsletter: Building Resilience to Climate Change

Author(s):
Loia Molipi
Year:
2010
Volume:
1
Pages:
4
Summary:

This issue covers the PACC project and also on the IWRM (Integrated Water Resources Management) project. Related water activities are also highlighted and likewise climate change related events.  Also inside this issue, a seasonal outlook for Tuvalu from May to July 2010 is also examined.

Funding Source:
GEF-SCCF

ALM's Adaptation Knowledge Needs Survey: A Synthesis Report

Author(s):
UNDP-ALM
Year:
2010
Summary:

 The 2010 Adaptation Knowledge Needs Survey was conducted to assess the current state of knowledge needs for CCA in order to identify knowledge needs and gaps to further the understanding of climate change impacts, vulnerabilities, and innovative adaptation approaches; and to identify key services (e.g. training workshops, seminars, newsletters, etc.) to facilitate knowledge exchange on current adaptation practices and lessons learned. The survey was made available in English, French and Spanish.

Funding Source:
GEF-SPA

Integrating climate change risks into water and flood management by vulnerable mountainous communities in the Greater Caucasus region of Azerbaijan

  • Project details

  • Implementing Agency:
    Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources
    Summary:

    Azerbaijan belongs to the world’s water stress countries. With current deficit of water resources being about 5 km3, the additional pressures on water resources due to climate change will seriously affect the rural water supply. The region of Greater Caucasus has been identified as particularly vulnerable in this regard. Paradoxically, most of the quality ground waters are formed in foothills of the Greater and Lesser Caucasus and constitute 24 million m3 (8.8.km3) per year. However, currently, only 20% of a total resource has been used.

    Project Components:
    1. Water and Flood management policy and regulatory frameworks to respond to climate change risks
    2. Technical capacities to improve climate risk management in the Greater Caucasus
    3. Water and Flood management practices demonstrated to lead to community resilience
    Expected Outputs:

    Outcomes:

    1. Water and Flood management framework is modified to respond to adaptation needs and improve climate risk management on over 22,067 sq. km 3of land in highly vulnerable region of Greater Caucasus.
    2. Key institutions have capacities, technical skills, tools and methods to apply advanced climate risk management practices for water stress and flood mitigation.
    3. Community resilience to floods and water stress improved by introducing locally tailored climate risk management practices benefiting over 1,000,000 people on total land area of 22,067 km2 of the Southern slopes of the Greater Caucasus.
    Contacts:

    Keti Chachibaia
    +421 2 59337 422
    keti.chachibaia@undp.org

    Project Status:
    Council Approved
    Project Details
    Funding Source:
    GEF-SCCF
    Financing Amount:
    USD 2,700,000
    Cofinancing Total:
    USD 7,260,000
    Total Amounts:
    USD 10,060,000

Climate Change Adaptation in the Tropical Andes

Author(s):
FAO
Year:
2011
Pages:
2
Summary:

The hydrologic stability of the Andean region depends on the services provided by micro-ecosystems found around and above 4000 masl (paramos, wetlands and glaciers).  Extremes in temperatures and an increase of precipitation and periods of drought will affect the region as a whole, exacerbating the intensity of natural disasters.  Such conditions endanger food security and disrupt the fragile hydrologic stability of the region, thereby jeopardizing the provision of water for downstream South American populations.  This project proposes a three-pronged appr

Funding Source:
FAO